Event Title

Concluding Remarks

Location

McIntyre 103

Event Website

http://archaeology.pugetsound.edu/RedfordConference2012/

Start Date

27-10-2012 5:30 PM

End Date

27-10-2012 6:00 PM

Description

Harrison (Nick) Eiteljorg, II, is a classical archaeologist whose major work has been on the entrances to the Athenian Acropolis, the monumental Propylaea of Mnesikles and its humbler predecessors. Being adept with computers, he began using CAD software in the 1980s in order to deal more effectively with the remains of the pre-Mnesiklean entrances. He became more deeply involved in the application of computer technologies to archaeological work, assisting in projects in Turkey and Italy and applying various new technologies to continuing work on the Propylaea.

Eiteljorg founded the Center for the Study of Architecture and started the CSA Newsletter, which is in its 24th year. The newsletter, now available only on the web, presents current information about computing in the discipline. Eiteljorg is also the lead author of Archaeological Computing. Eiteljorg has long been a proponent of archiving of digital files from archaeological work and began the Archaeological Data Archive Project in 1994 in conjunction with the computer committee of the Archaeological Institute of America.

Comments

Streaming video of presentation linked.

 
Oct 27th, 5:30 PM Oct 27th, 6:00 PM

Concluding Remarks

McIntyre 103

Harrison (Nick) Eiteljorg, II, is a classical archaeologist whose major work has been on the entrances to the Athenian Acropolis, the monumental Propylaea of Mnesikles and its humbler predecessors. Being adept with computers, he began using CAD software in the 1980s in order to deal more effectively with the remains of the pre-Mnesiklean entrances. He became more deeply involved in the application of computer technologies to archaeological work, assisting in projects in Turkey and Italy and applying various new technologies to continuing work on the Propylaea.

Eiteljorg founded the Center for the Study of Architecture and started the CSA Newsletter, which is in its 24th year. The newsletter, now available only on the web, presents current information about computing in the discipline. Eiteljorg is also the lead author of Archaeological Computing. Eiteljorg has long been a proponent of archiving of digital files from archaeological work and began the Archaeological Data Archive Project in 1994 in conjunction with the computer committee of the Archaeological Institute of America.

http://soundideas.pugetsound.edu/redfordconference2012/Events/Events/4